This Robotech Thing Tumblr Week(s) in Review, Feb. 17-28

I’d say up until the point that I posted the new episode of the This Robotech Thing YouTube show, it really wasn’t that eventful a couple of weeks on the Tumblr blog, which is my excuse for not posting a round-up next week. But really, if I’m being perfectly honest, I just forgot. And I am being perfectly honest, mostly because I’ve drank a little too much wine while shooting footage for the This Robotech Thing special I have planned for the 29th anniversary for the premiere of ROBOTECH in the week ahead. (That’ll be up here in a week’s time; keep your eye on the Tumblr blog or the YouTube channel to see it when it posts.)

For those who haven’t seen it, here’s the new episode of This Robotech Thing. Below that, the other stuff that’s gone up in the past two weeks.

Let’s start with the art I posted, which got started with a hell of a bang: some Fred Perry art from one of the best things they published in two years of doing ROBOTECH comics, the post-Robotech Masters adventure Rolling Thunder. This two-page spread is eye-catching, showcases how adept Perry is with drafting the classic Southern Cross mecha, how good he is at designing new mecha inspired by that show’s designs, and his distinctive, sleek, pointy character design style. It also shows off how much better Alan Nepomuceno is at coloring comic art than he is at writing a coherent story, since he would go on to write the infamous Robotech Sentinels: Rubicon comic that was cancelled after two wildly incoherent and mind-melting issues. This fiery, apocalplytically-colored piece is much better than that.

I also, for the hell of it, shared the hideous cover to the French release of Robotech: The Shadow Chronicles with the world. As Internet pal Lisa pointed out, the world was already blessed with more than enough useable images of that film’s overly boob-a-riffic version of Ariel, and there was no reason to create a new hideous 3D CG piece of art depicting that for the French market, and yet, they did! Very odd, and as far as I can tell it’s unique to that market. Maybe it was decided that a sole image of a CG girl with some major cleavage would sell the film better than anything else? Your guess is as good as mine.

In my quest for cool ROBOTECH art on deviantArt, I came across several images of New Generation biker chick Rook Bartley. I laid out two of them as a study in contrasts. Both cool pieces of art, but as I laid out in the post, one of them better matches the Rook I saw in my head back when I was reading about her rather than seeing her on the TV.

I ended that week by making my weak case for the Expeditionary Force Destroids, which I have a soft spot for. If I’m being completely honest, which I imagine I’m being because I’m still under the influence of too much wine, I have a soft spot for most of the poorly conceived robot designs that ROBOTECH has served us over the years, because I’m just generally in favor of more robots rather than fewer. I don’t even think the Waltrips’ Delta Fighter is completely terrible, and its transformation into Battloid is … err … dubious at best.

The “serious” non-show content kicked off with various photos of the Masterpiece Collection Beta Fighter I acquired with my tax refund money. While, as I remarked, it does feel a bit too much like an accessory for another toy I don’t own, I do think it’s about the most solid piece of high-end toy engineering that Toynami’s ever done. I like it. It’s fun to mess with. The transformation is simple and effective, although I still think the fighter should lock together a bit more securely. I love the way the big missile bay doors open; it’s a fun bit of engineering to deploy. And, speaking of missiles, a little over a week later I showed off various photos of Yamato’s Olive Drab Tomahawk Destroid toy, the other toy I snagged with tax refund cash. It’s also a fun, well engineered piece, although some of the stickers it asks you to apply are just ridiculous given the rounded surfaces it’s asking you to put them on. Despite that minor quibble, it’s as good a toy as you can get from that design, light years ahead of the old Matchbox toy. (As I said, given that it’s over ten times the price these days, it had better be.) While I can see why other Macross fans might be shrugging their shoulders and looking at a high-end Destroid toy with a screwed up scowl, I dig it. I’ve always loved that robot design, and even though I probably would have preferred the original on-screen color scheme, I don’t mind this one, especially given how much more the classic version goes for these days. (Curse Yamato for going under and driving up the prices of all their Macross toys!) It’s a fun toy! If you can find one for less than $200, I’d get it!

The remainder of these two weeks of content were animated GIFs of the Invid Inorganic Hellcat from Sentinels doing stuff, because I made ’em and decided to share ’em with the world. First, their approach reflected in the visor of a Red Bioroid. Next, a couple of them overwhelming a Bioroid Invid Fighter. And finally, one disabling one of Rem and Cabell’s cameras. Was everyone sick of Sentinels GIFs by that last one? Because I actually really like that last one, but it got the fewest notes of the three. I do think I led with the best, though. If I do any more, I’m definitely going to attack the proper Invid invasion of Tirol; as Shawn noted on the pic of the Invid Fighter getting piled on, the thing that is most exciting about the existing Sentinels animation is seeing the “bad guys” of the latter two generations duking it out, and the actual invasion footage features some great material of the actual Invid engaging the Bioroids. A project for when I’ve finished the 29th anniversary video, perhaps.

Mercifully, aside from completing the video, next week’s all laid out with some cool archive material, a bit I dug up from a cool artist’s on-line portfolio, and what the comic licensee was up to twenty years ago now. Hope you guys enjoy! I’ll probably post the next round-up in a couple of weeks’ time; that honestly seems about right.

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